The Jewel that Fell from the Stars


The Light Within by Lidia Kenig Scher
The Light Within by Lidia Kenig Scher (c)

How would you like to possess a magical jewel to help you fulfill your most cherished wishes? Well…you can have such jewel, it is not hard to find and although the journey maybe difficult, you don’t have to move from your home to have it!

According to Buddhist iconography, a magical wish-fulfilling stone fell from the stars long ago, and landed in Tibet where the ancient monks identified it as a jewel of amazing spiritual power. They called it Chintamani. Chinta means thought in Sanskrit and mani means stone. Its power to transform people’s lives and communities was considered so great, but so potentially disastrous if misused, that the monks ultimately sent it to the mystical hidden city of Shambhala where it would be guarded by a wrathful-looking deity called Mahakala. Known as the guardian of the Buddhist path of wisdom and compassion (dharma), the deity was said to be able to transform into seventy-five ferocious shapes to truly paralyze those with ignoble intentions.

Chintamani, the wish-fulfilling jewel rests deep within our hearts constantly vibrating Divine Love energy. It is our essential nature; wise, compassionate and courageous. The mind ruled by the heart is kind, ethical, creative and powerful.

It is like an oyster resting peacefully on the ocean’s floor on a bed of plankton; the inside of the shell is an iridescent sheen called nacre. But when any foreign substance penetrates the soft shell, be it a grain of sand or a parasite, the oyster engages in an unusual defense mechanism. It coats the invader with many layers of the iridescent reflective nacre, which over time forms into a hard luminous pearl.

Six-Armed Mahakala

Mahakala fiercely guards the heart’s pure essence and when we behave unethically, when our thoughts are of greed and revenge, when we abscond from responsibility or when we intend harm upon another, the land, the environment and all its inhabitants; our ignoble intentions are met, just like the mollusk’s invaders, with stern lessons that may ultimately lead to transformation into a luminous human.

Mahakala, like all deities is a teacher. All deities mirror qualities we must adopt in order to experience a life of bliss, wholesomeness, and fulfillment. They are also depicted with an array of implements that instruct us in understanding the thoughts and behaviors that keep us from manifesting our most cherished wishes. It behooves us to carefully examine their tools to both practice goodness and to avoid getting encased inside “nacre” and a life of misery.

The “fish” in this watercolor and mixed media painting is a metaphor for humans moving through the water of life with our half-submerged heads, focused mainly on ourselves and our petty needs. We create habits that beget unfulfilling results and are constantly seeking satisfaction outside ourselves. A shiny pebble in the distance (new love, a new house, a new haircut, or whatever) offers temporary happiness that we mistake for eternal joy. When the new brings dissatisfaction, we experience pain and apply old remedies (habits). We do this many, many times until the pain becomes unbearable and we are forced to confront our Mahakala.

We learn to take responsibility for our unconscious behavior, incorrect thinking, and baseless beliefs, when we become conscious and see it all reflected on the “water”; we notice carbon copies of us swimming about being miserable.

While this is indeed a difficult journey, when we change our focus, we are amply rewarded.

As we move from despair to sadness and into compassion, we begin to look inward and discover the jewel; our wise and courageous essential nature; our connection to Spirit. The love and gratefulness we experience comes from having the mettle to focus on the lesson and embrace the pain.

And we transform pain by encasing it in layers of wisdom, courage and compassion. These Chinta create the luminous magic that permeates our existence and all we touch.

Chintamani is the light within fiercely guarded by a awakened heart-mind.

Be a part in changing our pained world. Unroll your amazing spiritual power by purchasing The Light Within.

 

2 thoughts on “The Jewel that Fell from the Stars

  1. I “copied” this post and will pass it on to my Buddhist Center in Philadelphia. I never heard of this story and I am sure there are many like me who will enjoy it.

    Thanks.

    Michael J, Chenrezig Tibetan Buddhist Center of Philadelphia

    1. Thank you, Michael! There is a follow up story about “chintamani”. Bodisattva Ksitigharba, is often depicted holding the jewel. Story goes that the Buddha was teaching about “building a good hut” (the sutra of hut construction) when he noticed Ksitigharba teaching what is now called the “wish-granting jewel mantra” to disciples in the crowd. It appears that those who earnestly chanted the mantra, awakened on the spot. OM PAD MO USHNISHA VIMALE HUM PHAT. Each syllable contains the essence of each of the eightfold path teachings. It is the mantra I write on the Door Protectors I create and that are so successful. Blessings!

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